What’s the back story to this BART station graffiti wall?

How many San Francisco graffiti artists can you spot in this photo. Reader and keen urban observer Cole Brennan (Belle_Cunningham on Instagram) spotted this wall of graffiti signatures, on which the cleaning crew and artists seemed to have reached an accord:

Most graffiti gets cleaned off of the Muni system pretty regularly. Not so with the back of this map, which puts a neatly partitioned blank wall on the landing of the long stairs up from Bart. The graffiti artists and the cleaning crew seem to have some sort of detente worked out for this wall. I spend way too long trying to read it all, searching for new tags and regulars. That Rveng is classic, and you can’t throw a rock in this town without hitting something Zamar has tagged, but this is the first I’ve seen of Croak. Visiting artist? New tagger? Oldtimer just switching it up?

I’m no graffiti artist, and I won’t pretend to love all of it. Certainly, some tags demonstrate nothing but dull, amateur hubris. The good tags have a confidence that I admire, though.

Here’s an interview with Zamar, who created the mischievous squid seen all around town.

How to transform Clipper into a wearable

As far as looks go, Clipper is no match for the colorful Fast Passes of yesteryear, but if you have enough patience and geek skills, you can still remedy the situation. A clever life hacker on Hackernoon extracted the brains of the Clipper card and embedded into a bracelet. Blogger Stephen Cognetta got tired of carrying his Clipper card, so he extracted the brains of the Clipper card (the NFC chip) and embedded it into a couple of different styles of bracelets and wearables.

Here’s how:

First, he dissolved his Clipper card in a jar of acetone to extract just the NFC chip.

Then, he checked if the NFC chip is still functional: smart idea, there.

After that, you can embed the chip (and antennae) in almost any thing. The wearable world is your oyster!

Here’s the full post with step-by-step instructions. I’m thinking a Clipper card ring, a la mob boss style, is in order.

Thanks to Amy at Capp Street Crap for the tip.

Muni Life Lesson: Don’t lose your head

Mannequins ride Muni, too. Sometimes, they lose their heads. It happens to the best of us, of course: Who hasn’t lost their mind on Muni at one point or another?

h/t @Rachel_Jokes on Twitter

In other unsettling imagery, Muni Diaries readers once found a doll left behind on the N-Judah (that extra creepy placement, though…) and a doll so sketchy, Muni riders chose to wait in the rain rather than sit next to it.

Calling all podcast fans: Listen to our live stories on the new Muni Diaries podcast — bonus coolness points if you do so while riding Muni. Find us on iTunes and Google Play.

Your 2017 Bay to Breakers Costume Inspiration

muni door closing bay to breakers costume
Photo by Lindsay N

It is my firm belief that if you’ve lived in San Francisco for
a few years, you probably have a section in your wardrobe dedicated to costumed events, like Bay to Breakers this Sunday. If you are still looking for inspiration, look no further than our public transit system. Our current favorite is the young woman dressed up as “that painfully embarrassing Muni door moment,” above.

And despite drunken partiers, Bay to Breakers is also a quintessential San Francisco event that can change your experience of living here. In this week’s Muni Diaries podcast, storyteller (and Elbo Room sound man) Gabriel Armstrong shares his story of what happened when he carried his broken down B2B vehicle home on Muni, and scaring little kids on the way. Listen to his tale on iTunes and Google.

bay to breakers muni
Photo by Nick Fisher

More costume inspirations:


Photo by Octoferret

BayToBreakers144
Photo by prawnpie

And an awesome costume in action:

Want to show off your cool costume or spotted an especially creative B2B outfit on its way to the race? Tag us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Our email inbox muni.diaries.sf@gmail.com is always open!

Muni bus refuses to be defined by traditional line-naming

Why choose between two Chinatown lines when you could have a little of column A and a little of column B?

Rider @kilodelta reported this head-scratching Muni sign the other day. Is it equal parts 30-Stockton and 45-Union-Stockton? Is that this vehicle’s on-time rating? (At 66%, seems a bit high for a Stockton Street line).

Could this be the bus driver who also tried to pull the Jedi mind trick on a 5-Fulton driver recently?

We’ll take this confusion-inducer over the “Windows has computer” Powell station signage, which was really no help at all.

Spotted other Muni particularities? Tag us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Our email inbox muni.diaries.sf@gmail.com is always open!

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