How a fistfight on the 22-Fillmore ended with a FaceTime video from mom

What would you do if saw something going sideways on Muni? Rider Brian Cunnie was on the 22-Fillmore when he and a couple of other riders stood up for a young woman when they saw her boyfriend’s threatening behavior. Brian ended up taking some punches for the stranger, but bus justice ruled the day. Here’s his story:

I hadn’t gotten into a fight in 30 years until last Thursday evening on the 22-Fillmore. A young couple came on the bus, and he started yelling at her and punching the bus next to her head, and I asked him to please take it outside, and he asked me what I said, and I repeated, “Please take it outside.”

And then he punched me in the face: left fist, right fist, left fist again. I tackled him. It wasn’t a perfect rugby tackle — I wrapped his midsection instead of his waist — but it was enough to bring him down. Two fellow passengers helped subdue him while we waited for the cops to show up. The cops moved us apart and one of the officers kept asking me if I needed an ambulance. Then they asked if I wanted to press charges. I said that if he said he was wrong for punching me, I wouldn’t press charges.

So the young kid came out and looked me in the eye and said he was wrong to punch me and that he was sorry. I nodded, we shook hands and did a half-hug. One of the cops said, “That’s beautiful, man.” And then his girlfriend showed a FaceTime video of his mom thanking me for not pressing charges.

It was incredibly exhilarating and I would have easily spent hundreds of dollars for that experience. I mean, it was awesome.

The guy I’m in the picture with — the guy on the left, I think his name is Taylor — is one of the passengers who held the guy down. Heroic.

My name is Brian Cunnie, I’m a 54-year-old software developer in San Francisco who plays rugby.

This reminds me of the time when riders stood up against a Muni creeper, and when another group of riders put an end to some asswipe who thought body shaming was OK. It’s good to know that we’ve got each other’s backs when it comes to bad behavior.

Got other important stories for your fellow riders? Muni Diaries only exists because of your stories and submissions, so tag us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Our email inbox (muni.diaries.sf@gmail.com) is always open, too.

The Most San Francisco Illustration Ever

22Filmore

Ed. note: The artist was just so proud of his work–and he should be–that he put it up on Instagram before it was ready for its intended publication! We’ve swapped it out at his request for some more of his Muni-themed work, and we’ll be keeping an eye on his page for more.

Original post:
This is pretty much the most San Francisco illustration ever. We’ve got Laughing Sal from the Musée Mécanique, Doggie Diner doghead, Piedmont Boutique stockinged legs, Green Apple Books guy, and Lou Seal. To top it all off, they’re all riding Muni together. Thanks to @danbransfield on Instagram for posting this!

1958 Giants fans take Muni to Seals Stadium

sfmta 22 muni giants game
Photo via @sfmtaphoto

Whether you’re lucky enough to be at the World Series game today, you might appreciate this piece of history from SFMTA’s Photography Archive. This photo of the 22-Fillmore loading and unloading passengers was taken at Seals Stadium on April 29, 1958, the very first year that the Giants called SF home. The passengers were on their way to see the Giants vs. Phillies.

Seals Stadium was on 16th at Bryant, and this photo was taken just about a year before the stadium was demolished in 1959 when Candlestick Park was completed. The old site of Seals Stadium is now the Safeway shopping plaza.

Okay, history lesson over. Time to don your orange and black! Go, Giants!

Cool New Muni Fast Pass Posters Feature Your Neighborhood

mission muni fast pass poster

It’s no secret that everyone loves those colorful paper Fast Passes. It’s been a few years since they were taken out of regular use, but we found these great Muni posters by designer Brian Toth, who honors his favorite San Francisco neighborhoods in Fast Pass format.

We caught up with Brian to ask him why he created these posters.

The reason I created these was that, like most designers, I’m a huge fan of those old Muni passes. They are iconic, something I will always associate with San Francisco. I currently have a set of Muni Fast Passes from January, 2006, to January, 2011 hanging from my door in my apartment. I thought it would be interesting to use that familiar structure in the passes as a way to highlight some of the many neighborhoods in San Francisco

One of my favorite Muni lines has to be the 22-Fillmore. From Dogpatch to the Marina and all that’s in between, this line is one of my favorites. If you take the time to ride it from one end to the other you really get to see the many aspects of the city we all live in.

lower haight muni fast pass poster

The last time the Adult paper Fast Passes were in use was in 2011. Take a look at all the different incarnations that the paper Fast Passes through the years!

You can get one of Brian’s prints at Society6.

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