How to transform Clipper into a wearable

As far as looks go, Clipper is no match for the colorful Fast Passes of yesteryear, but if you have enough patience and geek skills, you can still remedy the situation. A clever life hacker on Hackernoon extracted the brains of the Clipper card and embedded into a bracelet. Blogger Stephen Cognetta got tired of carrying his Clipper card, so he extracted the brains of the Clipper card (the NFC chip) and embedded it into a couple of different styles of bracelets and wearables.

Here’s how:

First, he dissolved his Clipper card in a jar of acetone to extract just the NFC chip.

Then, he checked if the NFC chip is still functional: smart idea, there.

After that, you can embed the chip (and antennae) in almost any thing. The wearable world is your oyster!

Here’s the full post with step-by-step instructions. I’m thinking a Clipper card ring, a la mob boss style, is in order.

Thanks to Amy at Capp Street Crap for the tip.

Muni transfers to undergo serious make-under

Pic by Flickr user Christina B. Castro

They came for our Fast Passes, and we revolted by hoarding our local transit ephemera like Elaine Benes on her last box of sponges. In an attempt at modernizing the fare box experience, they are now coming for our Muni Transfers. SFist has the scoop on the uglier transfers set to replace our cheap-and-cheerful transit kaleidoscope.

I mean, I guess.

We wore Muni transfers. We used them as bookmarks. We turned the transfer into art. So excuse us for tipping our hats to another era gone by.

 

Another Muni Fare Increase Coming on July 1

Your daily $2.25 chariot is about to become your daily $2.50 ride, and more if you don’t use a Clipper card. The upcoming fare increase is a part of the Automatic Fare Indexing Policy that started in 2009, which means that prices are determined by a formula based on monetary inflation and operations costs. The nitty gritty formula is in the fare indexing policy page here.

This year’s fare hike details from the SFMTA:

Single-Trip Fares Current July 1, 2017
Regular Adult: Cash and Limited-Use Tickets (from Metro station machines) $2.50 $2.75
Regular Adult: Clipper Card and MuniMobile App $2.25 $2.50
Discount* Adult: Cash and Limited-Use Tickets $1.25 $1.35
Discount* Adult: Clipper Card or MuniMobile App $1.00 $1.25
Monthly Passes Current July 1, 2017
Adult “A” Monthly Pass (Muni + BART within San Francisco) $91.00 $94.00
Adult “M” Monthly Pass (Muni only) $73.00 $75.00
Adult Lifeline Monthly Pass (Low income) $36.00 $38.00
Discount* Monthly Pass (Muni only) $36.00 $38.00

*Discounted rates are available for youth (5-18), seniors (65+), people with disabilities and Medicare recipients.

If this seems more frequent than usual, you’re correct: the last fare increase in January was not a part of Automatic Fare Indexing but a change to the fare policy. Get more of those quarters (or your Clipper card) ready, folks. And remember the right currency: Muni no longer takes magic beans!

This Sunday’s Bay to Breakers Muni Details and Street Closures

bay to breakers muni

Here’s everything you need to know, transit-wise, about this Sunday’s Bay to Breakers. If you still don’t have your costume ready, you can dress up like Muni!

From the SFMTA:

Runners and walkers will start the route at Howard at Main streets in SoMa before setting off to traverse the iconic Hayes Street Hill and Golden Gate Park to Ocean Beach.

How to Get There on Muni

Pre-Race Service: Extra service will begin at 6 a.m. in the Muni Metro subway and on the NX Express, 5R Fulton Rapid, 38R Geary Rapid and the N Judah..

Post-Race Service: From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., extra service will be provided on the N Judah Line and the NX Express, 5X Fulton Express, 7 Haight/Noriega and 29 Sunset routes.

For complete details on extra service, please visit our Bay to Breakers Express Service page.

Muni Service and Traffic Impacts

Major traffic and Muni impacts across the city on Sunday will start as early as 5 a.m. and end as late as 4 p.m. For full details, please visit our Bay to Breakers Service Alert page.

Sunday morning and afternoon: Numerous Muni routes will be rerouted for the race across the city. For full details, please see the Transit Impacts section of our Bay to Breakers Service Alert page.

Starting Saturday at 6 p.m.: Due to event setup, there will also be reroutes near the start and finish lines on the 5, 7, 18, 25 and 38/38R routes.

For region-wide Bay to Breakers transportation information, please visit our partner transit agencies’ websites: BART, SamTrans, Caltrain, Golden Gate Ferry, AC Transit as well as 511.

Photo by Nick Fisher

Bike on BART? Strap it on, baby

bike strap on BART by prinzrob

Last September we told you about the new bike straps that BART was piloting in select cars, intending to secure unruly bicycles during bumping rides. Or during that false stop + go slightly + stop-stop. Ugh, you know what I’m talking about.

SFGate reported that, as a part of a new test program in 60 BART cars, you’ll find more of the storied straps, either Velcro or a buckle. Rider @prinzrob spotted the velcro variety on BART the other day.

Multi-modal riders: how are the new straps working out for you, and any tips you want to share with fellow cyclists/BART riders?

TBT: Roaring ’20s 33-Stanyan

Market_Street_Extension,_original_condition_at_switchback,_Mono_and_Caselli_1921_AAB-6185

Does this look familiar to our 33-Stanyan (er, 33-Ashbury/18th) regulars?

Today, it’s the scene of unparalleled Muni operator skill — the Market-Clayton switchback is srsly no joke. These same streets back in the day, 1921 to be exact, weren’t easy to navigate for ye olde streetcars, either. But operators came up with a creative solution to a problematic switchback. More on the Market Street switchback at Mono, Caselli, and Clayton from FoundSF.org:

This sharp turn from Clayton to Market was not negotiable by early streetcars so operators would “switch” the backs of the passenger seats at Market Street, thereby “switching” the streetcar in the reverse direction.

Before, in 1925:
Market-and-Clayton-switchback-(Market-called-Falcon-until-1927)-c-1920_SFDPW

After, in 2010:

Castro1$switchback-1919
Photo: Michael Greene, San Francisco, CA

Thanks to reader Robert Holt for the tip.

More #TBT:
Ever heard of Muni’s 1-Sutter?
Awesome vintage video documents fight to save cable cars

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